CYBER

Communicate your buildings' energy rating


The European Display® Campaign is a voluntary scheme designed by energy experts from European towns and cities. The objective of the Display® Campaign is to show that the Energy Performance of Buildings Directive (EPBD) – that aims to reduce the energy consumption of buildings in Europe – can be significantly accelerated if local authorities stimulate behavioural change through communicating the energy performances of their buildings to politicians, technicians, building users, different municipal departments and the public.

Energy certificates need to be used not only as a legal requirement but also as a means of communicating with the public and politicians. Their display is the first step in the communication campaign. If certificates are designed to be eye – catching, engaging and easy to understand, they can be used as a communication tool for a wide variety of audiences, from school children to politicians.

Display® Campaign achievements

By mid-2011, almost 500 Displayers were participating in the Campaign. Together these participants have produced over 30,000 posters for nearly 15,000 buildings. France remains the leading country in terms of number of participants with almost 200 Display® members. This impressive figure can be explained by the adaptation of the Display® software and poster to the French legislation. This came about thanks to the support and involvement of the French Ministry of Ecology, Sustainable Development, Transport and Housing in the French Display® Users’ Clubs as well as the ability of a number of the larger local authorities to get each urban area or village to individually join Display®. Switzerland is the second most represented country among participants, with more than 69 Displayers. The number of UK participants has remained static since the England and Wales implementation scheme (DEC) came into force. Since 2009 a particular interest has been observed from Ukrainian and Hungarian cities.

(c) EU Patrick Mascart

About

Authors

Ian Turner

Publication year

2011

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english